Month: April 2014

Summer Plans for Pending Red Wings Free Agents

Kyle Quincey

Photo courtesy of Rick Osentoski/USA TODAY Sports

Free Agency should be fun for the Red Wings this summer. They have cap room to spend and issues to address. The free agent signing period, or #QuinceyWatch2014, will give Detroit a chance to add some size and talent to a roster that was lacking in the physicality department in their first round matchup against Boston.

Today, we are going to take a look at the pending unrestricted free agents. The Red Wings have seven players on the current roster (or injured reserve) slated for free agency this summer: David Legwand, C; Daniel Alfredsson, RW; Mikael Samuelsson, RW; Todd Bertuzzi, RW; Daniel Cleary, RW; Kyle Quincey, D; and Jonas Gustavsson, G.

For each player, we are assigning their Hockeytown Lineup Probability (HLP) for next season. What does that mean? It’s the probability that they will be on the opening night roster next season. I will not say which members of the current team have a 100% HLP in order not to jinx them. I’m a goalie and am very superstitious.

HLP

 

Kyle Quincey has the best chance at returning next season. While his play has been consistently average, he is a better fit than a lot of free agents. The free agent defenseman pool will be thin this summer and he may be able to give the Red Wings a discount. I would prefer the Red Wings to bring in someone else, but the reality of that is less likely than Kyle Quincey returning.

Jonas Gustavsson has a decent chance of returning too. He played great this season when Jimmy Howard was injured or underperforming. If the Red Wings want to keep Petr Mrazek in the minors for one more season, I think Gustavsson would sign a one-year deal to stay another year. He could test the market though after a solid season.

In my opinion, Daniel Alfredsson has a spot for next season if he wants to play another season. He may be an old man, but still led the Red Wings in scoring this season and provided veteran leadership in the locker room while Pavel Datsyuk and Henrik Zetterberg were out. Another one-year deal is possible if Alfie wants to play another year.

For the rest of the free agents, a return would be slim. Daniel Cleary, Mikael Samuelsson, and David Legwand are as good as gone. Todd Bertuzzi could return for another year if Detroit needs a physical presence on the ice, but probably would not play much. They could sign David Legwand to a multi-year deal to compensate for sending Patrick Eaves, Calle Jarnkrok, and a second round pick to Nashville for Legwand at the trade deadline. It would be hard to see the Red Wings resign him with Zetterberg, Datsyuk, Stephen Weiss, Darren Helm, Riley Sheahan, and Joakim Andersson slated at center on the depth chart, though. However, trades and buyouts happen and the Red Wings are primed to do one or both this summer. There are reports out that while Daniel Cleary will not be in the Red Wings’ lineup next year, he may be in their front office after playing the last decade in Detroit.

What do you think?

Top 9: Career Shorthanded Goals for the Red Wings

Detroit’s penalty kill was abysmal against the Bruins. Just horrible. But now it is the offseason and the Red Wings’ management can look to the free agent market, trading block, and minors for players that can better contribute to the penalty kill. They could also find someone else to coach the special teams with a struggling power play as well. I heard Adam Oates is available for power play duties.

This Tuesday’s Top 9 will focus on the top scoring penalty killers the Red Wings have sent out over the course of their history. It is more of a Top 8 with a couple of ties on the list. Are there any surprises?

8. Marcel Dionne, Nicklas Lidstrom, and John Ogrodnick: 10 goals

Marcel Dionne

Marcel Dionne – Photo courtesy of Hockey Hall of Fame

6. Gordie Howe and Nick Libett: 11 goals

Gordie Howe

Gordie Howe – Photo courtesy of Walter Iooss Jr./SI

5. Shawn Burr: 14 goals

Shawn Burr

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

4. Kirk Maltby: 18 goals

Kirk Maltby

Photo courtesy of Detroit Red Wings

3. Kris Draper: 21 goals

Kris Draper

Photo courtesy of Detroit Red Wings

2. Sergei Fedorov: 31 goals

Sergei Fedorov

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

1. Steve Yzerman: 50 goals

Steve Yzerman

Photo courtesy of Hockey Hall of Fame

 

Stats provided by hockey-reference.com

Best Draft in Detroit Red Wings History?

Ken Holland and the Red Wings scouts have made a living drafting players in late rounds that blossomed into superstars (see Pavel Datsyuk and Henrik Zetterberg). Some players have been busts though. Igor Grigorenko and Tom McCollum certainly fit that description, although Grigorenko had the excuse of being in a car accident and never really regaining his form.

There have been a couple drafts in Detroit’s history that stand out as their best, but which one is the overall best? Let’s take a look at the 1983 and 1989 drafts.

Steve Yzerman

Photo courtesy of Steve Babineau/Getty Images

In 1983, the Red Wings had the fourth overall pick and were lucky enough to have Steve Yzerman fall to him. We could just compare Yzerman to the other draft and have a pretty good argument for his draft being the best. They took Lane Lambert in the second round and had him for three okay seasons before trading him to New York for Glen Hanlon. In the third round, the Red Wings picked another long-time Red Wing in Bob Probert. Detroit took Czech sniper Petr Klima 86th overall and then Grind Line member Joe Kocur two picks later. Finally, the Red Wings took Stu Grimson in the tenth round for some more toughness. Grimson did not sign and was drafted again by Calgary two years later. Combined, this draft produced 1,323 goals, 1,713 assists, 3,036 points, and over 10,000 penalty minutes in the careers of those players. They also combined for six Stanley Cup rings.

Nicklas Lidstrom

Photo courtesy of Doug Maclelland/Getty Images

Six years later in 1989, the Red Wings were coming off of a Western Conference finals loss to the eventual Stanley Cup champion Edmonton Oilers. They had reached the Western Conference finals the year before as well. In the draft, they took Regina Pats center, Mike Sillinger, in the first round with the 11th pick. In the second round, the Red Wings drafted defenseman Bob Boughner. Then the fun began. The Wings took Nicklas Lidstrom, Sergei Fedorov, and Dallas Drake in the third, fourth, and sixth rounds, respectively. Finally, in the 11th round, Detroit took a chance and drafted a Russian defenseman by the name of Vladimir Konstantinov. Of the 14 players drafted in 1989, only one other player besides those mentioned played a game in the NHL (Shawn McCosh played nine games in his career). All of these players combined for 1,227 goals, 2,367 assists, 3,594 points, and over 5,000 penalty minutes. These players also combined for nine Stanley Cup rings as well.

So which draft was better? For the sake of this argument, let’s decide which draft was better for the Red Wings.

The players from the 1983 had direct and indirect impacts on winning the recent championships. Steve Yzerman was obviously at the center of it all. Joey Kocur was there grinding it out. Stu Grimson and Bob Probert were there before the championships to protect the skilled players as they developed. Petr Klima indirectly helped as well. He was traded in a package for Jimmy Carson, who was traded to Los Angeles later for Paul Coffey in a multi-player deal. Paul Coffey would eventually be sent to Hartford for Brendan Shanahan, who was right there alongside Yzerman for three championships.

From the 1989 draft, Lidstrom, Fedorov, and Konstantinov developed with the Wings and won the 1997 championship together. Bob Boughner and Mike Sillinger did not have any impact on the Cup runs. Sillinger was actually traded for Stu Grimson in 1995 before the run to the finals. Nicklas Lidstrom and Sergei Fedorov were dynasty players that were essential to winning the 1998 and 2002 Stanley Cups as well. Dallas Drake and Lidstrom were in Detroit for the 2008 Cup as well.

My vote: the 1989 draft was the best. It comes down to Yzerman vs. Fedorov and Lidstrom. Steve Yzerman was my hockey idol growing up, but Fedorov and Lidstrom were essential to starting the Red Wings dynasty.

What do you think?

 

Stats and draft results provided by hockeydb.com

Throwback Thursday: Looking to the 1998 Red Wings for Tonight’s Motivation

Chris Osgood

Photo courtesy of AP

Around this time of the year in 1998, the Red Wings were gearing up for Game 4 of their first round matchup against Phoenix. They had just come off of back-to-back losses to the Coyotes, where Chris Osgood had performed below expectations. We all remember Jeremy Roenick blasting a clapper past Osgood from center ice.

Going into Game 4 down two-to-one in the series and on the road, Detroit had every reason to lose and eventually lose the series. Chris Osgood could have let the Coyotes rattle him again and it looked that way early after an early goal. After that, Osgood shut them down. The Red Wings roared back and took the game, winning 4-2.

The current Red Wings are in a similar situation today. Although they are not the favorites this year, the Red Wings have their backs against the wall going into Game 4 against Boston. The Bruins could beat Detroit tonight and finish off the Red Wings at home in Boston on Saturday. I don’t think the Red Wings’ locker room leadership will let that happen though.

Imagine the confidence tonight. Todd Bertuzzi is in the lineup and ready to go. Henrik Zetterberg may make his return tonight. There is no one in the locker room who thinks they are the underdogs tonight. Bertuzzi has played the game a long time and is dying for a Cup before he calls it quits. He will be on his horse tonight and hitting everything he can. Zetterberg, though probably not at 100%, will give it all he’s got. The team will see that and take note (see Zetterberg’s Impact on the Offense).

Can today’s Red Wings repeat history and follow in the footsteps of Chris Osgood and company? Can Jimmy Howard step up and shut down Boston on his own like he did in the first game of the series? Will Bertuzzi and Zetterberg have an impact the offense that has scored two goals in three games?

Game 2 of the 1998 first round matchup with Phoenix was the last time the Red Wings lost on April 24th. I’d like to wait before seeing another loss on today’s date.

Side Note: Congratulations to Pavel Datsyuk and his wife, Svetlana, on the birth of their baby girl. Also, best of luck to Niklas Kronwall and his girlfriend, who is currently in labor.

Tonight’s Projected Lines:

Zetterberg (hooray!) – Datsyuk – Abdelkader

Franzen – Helm – Nyquist

Tatar – Sheahan – Bertuzzi

Miller – Glendening – Legwand

Kronwall – Smith

Quincey – DeKeyser

Kindl – Lashoff

Top 9: Detroit Red Wings All-Time Playoff Scorers

We need to score tonight. A coach’s favorite phrase to motivate the team (and demotivate the goalie) is, “(Goalie) can’t win the game for us tonight. He can only lose it. It’s up to you, the skaters, to score and win the game.” Tonight, Pavel Datsyuk and the boys need to put some biscuits in the basket and give Jimmy Howard some help.

Hoping this will encourage the Red Wings to score more, we are going to take a look at the all-time playoff leading scorers. Though Gordie Howe has the team record for points per game in the playoffs, was he number one on the list?

9. Ted Lindsay– 88 PTS

Ted Lindsay

Photo courtesy of Richard Bak/HHOF

8. Tomas Holmstrom– 97 PTS

Tomas Holmstrom

Photo courtesy of Tim Sharp/AP

T6. Pavel Datsyuk- 104 PTS

Pavel Datsyuk

Photo courtesy of AP

T6. Alex Delvecchio– 104 PTS

Alex Delvecchio

Photo courtesy of Denis Brodeur/NHLI/Getty Images

5. Henrik Zetterberg– 114 PTS

Henrik Zetterberg

Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Jason Cohn

4. Gordie Howe- 158 PTS

Gordie Howe

Photo courtesy of USA Today

3. Sergei Fedorov– 163 PTS

Sergei Fedorov

Photo courtesy of Tom Pidgeon/AP

2. Nicklas Lidstrom– 183 PTS

Nicklas Lidstrom

Photo courtesy of Gene J. Puskar/AP

1. Steve Yzerman– 185 PTS

Steve Yzerman

Photo courtesy of Dave Sandford/HHOF

 

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detroit_Red_Wings

Offense With and Without Henrik Zetterberg

Henrik Zetterberg

Photo courtesy of AP

Two goals in two games is not where the Detroit offense would like to be heading back to Detroit for Games 3 and 4. Although the Red Wings managed to win with only one goal in Game 1, they cannot win the series by winning three more games by that 1-0 score. Most every player has at least one thing to work on for Game 3, one simple solution fans are calling for is for Henrik Zetterberg to return to the lineup.

Zetterberg has been out since the Olympic Break following back surgery and has been skating with the team recently. Ken Holland previously said that Z (and Jonathan Ericsson) would be out for the first round and may be back for the second round. Fans are still hoping that they will make an appearance against Boston. I am one of those fans, but have reservation about Zetterberg returning possibly too soon.

Players play hurt in the NHL playoffs all the time. I’m positive that Zetterberg wants none other than to be out there with the guys and beat the Bruins. Team Doctors monitoring their patient and owners monitoring their investment may say otherwise. Zetterberg will return as soon as he can, but when exactly will that be? And when he does, what will happen?

Bad News (Bruins)-

  1. Too soon? Back surgery recovery is nothing to mess with. Zetterberg could not even get out of his bed after Sweden’s first game in Sochi. He was in a lot of pain before and needs to fully recover so nothing lingers.
  2. Bruins’ Defense. Boston features big, strong defense. Torey Krug may not fit that mold, but the rest do. Henrik likes to be a little physical while playing to get to the net. He will take a beating from Boston’s D that might aggrevate his back. Would it be worth it for Z to return for a few games, but hurt his back again?
  3. Someone comes out of the lineup. Who gets scratched if Zetterberg returns? Legwand? Miller? Jurco? If it was my guess, I would think David Legwand would be scratched first. Tomas Jurco had a great Game 2 and is playing a physical game against the big Bruins. He hasn’t done much offensively or on the power play, but neither have Tomas Tatar, Gustav Nyquist, Riley Sheahan, or Daniel Alfredsson. Drew Miller may not be the most skilled player, but he has played well on the penalty kill. No matter who comes out, each has a reason to stay in and Mike Babcock will have a tough decision. The decision to play a healed Henrik Zetterberg is an easy one though.

Good News-

  1. More offense. Zetterberg’s return to the lineup obviously brings more offense. He won the Conn Smythe trophy in 2008 and almost led the team in scoring this season, despite missing nearly half of the games. His point-per-game scoring rate will help our sputtering offense immediately.
  2. Leadership. When a team sees their captain come back from injury and give his all, they will be inspired. The 2002 Red Wings did it for Steve Yzerman. It holds true for any level of hockey. When a captain returns to the lineup and shows more grit than anyone on the ice, the team will follow suit and play their hearts out for him. Z has that sort of respect in the locker room.
  3. Wake up others. Zetterberg’s return will create a competition to not be the one who is scratched. There are plenty of options at this point, so the boys will be on their game for Game 3. In addition, Zetterberg’s offensive skills will create room for others on the ice. It’s apparent when Pavel Datsyuk is on the ice that the Bruins leave others alone to neutralize him. In Game 2 when Datsyuk threw the nasty backhand sauce to a trailing Brendan Smith, the replay showed four Bruins within three feet of Datsyuk with two guys trailing wide open. Datsyuk can create offense and so can Zetterberg.

 

In the meantime, Detroit needs to learn to score and create offense against Boston without him. They have been doing it for most of the year anyway. If the Red Wings can dictate the pace, they can win and let Zetterberg rest up. Game 3 needs to be played like Game 1 for Detroit to go anywhere. Let’s see it, Red Wings.

Detroit Red Wings Playoff Hockey: More Than Just a Game

Pavel Datsyuk

Photo courtesy of Marc DesRosiers/USA Today Sports

It’s gameday.

Today is the return of Red Wings playoff hockey. For the 23rd year in a row, Detroit’s beloved hockey team will begin its quest for the Stanley Cup.

Legends of the game have donned the Winged Wheel in pursuit of the most glorious trophy in sports. Some have succeeded, while others have failed. However, every year there is an optimistic feeling entering the playoffs, no matter what the circumstances are. Biased? Maybe.

As a Red Wings fans, I’ve seen it all. We have been the number one seed and captured the Cup. We have also been the number one seed and have been eliminated in the first round. Anything is possible.

We have seen the highs. “McCarty draws. McCarty in. McCarty…SCORES! A magnificent goal! Darren McCarty!” We’ve seen Igor Larionov, the oldest player on the ice, shelf a backhand over a sprawling Arturs Irbe in triple overtime. We’ve seen Steve Yzerman (three times) and Nicklas Lidstrom hoist the Stanley Cup while the Red Wings faithful erupt in a euphoria unlike any other.

We have seen the lows too. Both Yzerman and Lidstrom had their careers come to a close after a disappointed first round upset. We’ve seen the New Jersey Devils sweep the Red Wings in the finals after Detroit had steamrolled everyone in their path. We’ve seen Claude Lemieux smash Kris Draper’s face in. On top of that, the Avalanche eliminating the Red Wings after a record-setting 62 wins during the regular season to advance to the finals was a tough pill to swallow.

Vladimir Konstantinov

Photo courtesy of Al Bello/Getty Images

Emotion does not quite capture the feeling of Red Wings fans during playoff season. Though we are away from the players in the stands or through the TV at home, we are there with the players feeling what they feel. Hockeytown’s reaction to the 1997 Stanley Cup championship was equivalent to Steve Yzerman, Brendan Shanahan, and the rest of the team celebrating on the ice after overcoming so many obstacles during the season.

Nothing can compare to the way hockey players feel after winning a championship. Hockeytown knows that feeling though, even if we are not on the ice with them. The feeling after losing a crucial game and having your season end is one of the worst, most gut-wrenching emotions every hockey player will endure. Detroit knows that feeling as well. But every year, we hope and pray for that championship elation at the end of the playoffs. Addiction? Possibly.

As the 2014 playoffs begin, we ready ourselves for a familiar setting, even if some things are different. Sure, Henrik Zetterberg and Jonathan Ericsson are out of the lineup, but can that stop Detroit? No. We are the eighth seed playing the President’s Trophy-winning Bruins. Is that a problem? No, Edmonton eliminated us in a similar circumstance in 2006. We might as well have the top seed with all the confidence the Red Wings and fans have entering the first round.

Best of luck, Detroit. We are all behind you and cannot wait to see the Red Wings on top at the end of the pursuit.

Let’s go Red Wings.

Throwback Thursday: Taking a look back at the 1997 Detroit Red Wings

Steve Yzerman

Photo courtesy of Mary Schroeder/Detroit Free Press

In the spring of 1997, the Detroit Red Wings captured Lord Stanley’s Cup for the first time in 42 years. Steve Yzerman led the team through a trying regular season to the finals, where the Red Wings faced off against the Philadelphia Flyers. You all know this though. We all know this. I even have the championship video committed to memory and have been able to recite the lines from the “documentary” since I was a kid.

This Stanley Cup victory was especially sweet for Detroit because most of the Red Wings’ fan base had not seen a championship in their lifetime. It was the first one I had seen, despite the fact that I was only seven. It was also the first my dad had seen though. That victory was the first time the Stanley Cup was brought home to Hockeytown since my Grandpa was 33 years old.

Detroit had a rough season that year trying to find an identity. They had won a league record 62 games the previous season, but did not bring home the Cup. The year before, the Red Wings were swept by the New Jersey Devils in the first round. The Wings had a coming-together moment on March 26th that propelled them into the playoffs on a high note. Darren McCarty finally got his vengeance on Claude Lemieux for his hit on Kris Draper the previous spring. Patrick Roy came to Lemieux’s aid, but Brendan Shanahan met him at center ice. Adam Foote and Mike Vernon soon joined the fray. All of this started from a stop in the play because of Igor Larionov going after Peter Forsberg. Even though “The Professor” was over a decade younger than Forsberg, he stood up and helped to inspire the team. Detroit came back to win the game 6-5 in overtime.

Those were only a few players crucial to the team’s success that year. Scotty Bowman and the Red Wing’s front office put together a grittier team than recent years, instead of relying on talent alone. Let’s take a look at the lineup and how each player was acquired.

C: Steve Yzerman (C) – Drafted 4th overall by Detroit in the 1983 Draft.

LW: Tomas Sandstrom – Acquired from Pittsburgh for Greg Johnson halfway through the season.

RW: Darren McCarty – Drafted 46th overall by Detroit in 1992.

C: Sergei Fedorov (A) – Drafted 74th overall by Detroit in 1989.

LW: Slava Kozlov – Drafted 45th overall by Detroit in 1990.

RW: Doug Brown – Claimed off waivers from New Jersey in 1995.

C: Igor Larionov – Acquired from San Jose for Ray Sheppard in 1995.

LW: Brendan Shanahan – Acquired from Hartford along with Brian Glynn for Keith Primeau, Paul Coffey, and a first round pick one game into the season.

RW: Martin Lapointe – Drafted 10th overall by Detroit in 1991.

C: Kris Draper – Acquired from Winnipeg in 1993 for future considerations ($1).

LW: Kirk Maltby – Acquired from Edmonton for Dan McGillis in 1996.

RW: Joey Kocur – Signed as a free agent in December of that season.

D: Nicklas Lidstrom – Drafted 53rd overall by Detroit in 1989.

D: Larry Murphy – Acquired from Toronto at the trade deadline for future considerations.

D: Slava Fetisov – Acquired from New Jersey in 1995 for a third round pick.

D: Vladimir Konstantinov – Drafted 221st overall by Detroit in 1989.

D: Aaron Ward – Acquired from Winnipeg for Paul Ysabaert and a fourth round pick in 1993.

D: Bob Rouse – Signed as a free agent prior to the 1994-95 season.

G: Mike Vernon – Acquired from Calgary for Steve Chiasson in 1994.

G: Chris Osgood – Drafted 54th overall by Detroit in 1991.

 

Other key contributors that season drafted by Detroit were Mathieu Dandenault, Jamie Pushor, Tomas Holmstrom, Kevin Hodson, and Anders Eriksson. Detroit signed Tim Taylor as a free agent in 1993.

Shanahan, Lapointe, McCarty, Sandstrom, Draper, Maltby, and Kocur gave Detroit sandpaper that they could balance across all four lines. The acquisition of Larry Murphy gave Detroit’s defense a former Cup winner that brought out the best in Nick Lidstrom.

No one predicted this team would win the Cup in 1997 after everyone did the previous year. The Red Wings overcame adversity to eventually become the best team in the NHL. Who is to say the Red Wings of 2014 can’t do the same?

Showing the Goalies Some Love: Top 9 Red Wings’ Wins Leaders

It’s time to give the goalies some love. We already posted our Red Wing of the Day (#RWOTD) on Twitter this morning to feature Chris Osgood, but the tenders need more love than that. The Red Wings have been lucky to have a collection of great goalies in their history. Terry Sawchuk, Roger Crozier, Dominik Hasek, and Osgood have all starred in net for the Wings.

Jimmy Howard is the newest addition to Red Wings goalies trying to bring the Cup back to Hockeytown. Some have been successful. Others, like Jimmy, have not. In hopes to provide Jim with some luck starting Friday, let’s take a look at Detroit’s Top 9 wins leaders.

9. Manny Legace– 112 Wins

Manny Legace

Photo courtesy of AP

8. Dominik Hasek- 114 Wins

Dominik Hasek

Photo courtesy of AP

7. Greg Stefan– 115 Wins

Greg Stefan

Photo courtesy of GoaliesArchive.com

6. Tim Cheveldae– 128 Wins

Tim Cheveldae

Photo courtesy of GoaliesArchive.com

5. Roger Crozier- 131 Wins

Roger Crozier

Photo courtesy of redwings.nhl.com

4. Jimmy Howard- 152 Wins

Jimmy Howard

Photo courtesy of AP

3. Harry Lumley– 163 Wins

Harry Lumley

Photo courtesy of GoaliesArchive.com

2. Chris Osgood- 317 Wins

Chris Osgood

Photo courtesy of AP

1. Terry Sawchuk- 351 Wins

Terry Sawchuk

Photo courtesy of John G. Zimmerman/SI

 

 

Win Totals provided by http://www.hockey-reference.com.

Top 9: Odd Facts from the Regular Season

This past season has been a strange one by Red Wings’ standards. Injuries, new conference opponents, youth in the lineup, and a compressed schedule (because of the Olympics) have made the regular season a trying one at times. However, Detroit persevered and made the playoffs for the 23rd straight season. Before the Red Wings take on the big, bad Bruins on Friday, let’s take a look at the Top 9 odd notes from this season:

Mike Babcock

Photo courtesy of Norm Hall/NHLI

9. In a season marred by injuries and losing streaks, Mike Babcock passed both Scotty Bowman and Jack Adams to become the Red Wings’ all-time coaching wins leader. Babs finished the regular season with 415 wins in Detroit. Hopefully there will be many more wins added to that number.

 

 

Gordie Howe

Photo courtesy of Richard Meek/SI

8. In his first season in Detroit, Daniel Alfredsson led the Red Wings with 49 points. He is the oldest player (41) to lead the Red Wings in scoring since Gordie Howe did it during the 1969-70 season. I’d like to see Detroit bring back Alfredsson for another season, but we will get to that once the playoffs are over and free agency and the draft are the priorities.

 

 

 

Daniel Alfredsson

Photo courtesy of Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

7. Alfredsson and Niklas Kronwall led the team with 49 points this season, though Alfredsson scored that many in fewer games that Kronwall. Their point totals were the lowest to lead the Red Wings in scoring since Joe Carveth led Detroit with 35 points during the 1945-46 season. Back then, teams only played 48 games in the regular season.

 

 

Fedorov

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

6. Alfredsson and Kronwall’s 49 points is the lowest to lead Detroit in scoring in the Modern Era. No one has led Detroit with less points since teams began playing 70 games (or 80, or 82, or 84…) in the regular season. Players like Howe, Steve Yzerman, and Sergei Fedorov consistently scored more than 49 points. In fact, they usually hit the 49-point mark 49 games into the season (or earlier).

 

 

 

 

 

Pavel Datsyuk

Photo courtesy of Marc DesRosiers/USA Today Sports

5. On that note, Pavel Datsyuk scored 49 points last season…in 47 games. The Magic Man scored as many points as Detroit’s leaders this season in a lockout-shortened year last year. In addition, during the 1994-95 lockout-shortened season, both Fedorov and Paul Coffey bested 49 points each. Offense dipped this year, but it was spread out amongst many different players.

 

 

 

 

Jimmy Howard

Photo courtesy of Richard Wolowicz/Getty Images

4. Jimmy Howard‘s 21 wins are the lowest to lead the Red Wings since Glen Hanlon only won 15 for Detroit during the 1989-90 season. That was the last season before the playoff streak started. Injuries to the lineup, inconsistent play, and injuries to Jimmy himself prevented that number from being higher.

 

 

 

 

 

Gustav Nyquist

Photo courtesy of Dave Reginek/Detroit Red Wings

3. Gustav Nyquist led Detroit with 28 goals this season. The odd fact about that was that he was not part of the opening night lineup. Nyquist started the year in the minors and played 15 games for the Grand Rapids Griffins before getting called up to the show. It was more of a salary cap move to keep Nyquist in the minors for so long, but the signings of Daniel Cleary during training camp and Mikael Samuelsson and Jordin Tootoo the previous season to play over Nyquist was questionable then and now.

 

 

Tomas Jurco

Photo courtesy of Julian H. Gonzalez/Detroit Free Press

2. The Red Wings had nine different players make their NHL debuts this season. Tomas Jurco, Luke GlendeningLandon Ferraro, Teemu Pulkkinen, and Mitch Callahan got a chance to crack the top-12 forwards, while Adam Almqvist, Alexey Marchenko, Xavier Ouellet, and Ryan Sproul made their NHL debuts on defense. So many rookies making cracking the lineup is certainly an oddity in Detroit, considering the Red Wings overdevelop their prospects and prefer to have veterans suit up over rookies.

 

Steve Yzerman

Photo courtesy of Mary Schroeder/Detroit Free Press

1. Detroit’s 39 wins this season is the lowest win total in a non-lockout-shortened season since the 1996-97 team finished the year with 38 wins. While losing sucks, I’ll gladly take 39 wins because the Red Wings happened to win the Stanley Cup in 1997 after the “subpar” regular season.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statistics provided by hockeydb.com